FAQ – Frequently Answered Questions

People from all over the world ask us some pretty interesting questions.

Here you’ll find the most frequent along with the best answers we have.

If your question’s answer isn’t here, you’ll likely find the answer by using the Search Box. If no luck there, use the form on the Contact Us page to send us your questions. We will do our best to email an accurate response.

Find photos and maps to Molokai churches here – Molokai Churches

KAUNAKAKAI
Calvary Chapel Sunday 9:30 am
Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints, Sun 9:00 am
Catholic Church at Kalanianeole Hall, Sunday 9:00 am, Saturday 6:00 pm, Confession 4:00 pm
Molokai Church of God, Sunday 10:00 a.m
Ka Hale La’a Jerusalema Hou, Sunday 10:30 am
Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, Sunday 9:30 am
Jerusalem Pomaiki Church, Sunday 9:00 am
Lighthouse Church of Nazarene, Sunday 10:00 am
Lambof God Church & Bible Study, Sunday 9:00 am
Molokai Christian Fellowship, Sunday 9:00 am and 6:40 pm
First Assembly King’s Chapel Molokai, Sunday 9:00 am
Way of Salvation Church, Sunday 9:30 am
Molokai Seventh Day Adventist, Saturday 11:00 am
Kaunakaka’i Baptist Church, Sunday 10:15 am
The Apostolic Faith Church, Sunday 9:00am
Kalaiakamanu Hou Congregational Church, Sunday 9:30 am
Guzejji Soto Mission. 3rd Sunday, 10:00 am

KAWELA
Calvary Door of Faith Church, Sunday 9:30 am

KUALAPU’U
Friendly Isle Christian Fellowship, Sunday 9:30 am

EAST END
Bahai Faith of Molokal, Sunday 10:00am
OurLady of (Seven) Sorrows, Sunday 7:00 am
Gospel Shoes of Christ Jesus, Sunday 9:00 am
Waialua Congregational Church, Sunday 11:00 am
Kalua’aha Congregational Church, 4th Sunday 12:30pm

HO’OLEHUA
Moloka’i Baptist Church, Sunday 10:00 am
Molokai Shekinah Glory Church, Sunday 10:00 am
Grace Episcopal Church, Sunday 10:00 am
Ho’olehua Congregational Church, Sunday 8:15 am

MAUNALOA
Maunaloa Door of Faith Outreach, Sunday, 9:30 am
St. Vincent Frerrer Catholic Church, Sunday 11:00 am

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS

Friendly Island Fellowship
Molokai General Hospital – Dining Room
Kaunakakai
Monday 7-8 pm
Thursday 7-8 pm

Mana’e Meeting
Ka Hale Pomaka’i, 13.5 miles east of Kaunakakai
Wednesday 5:30-6:30 pm
Saturday 5:30-6:30 pm

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS

No Fear Meeting
Ka Hale Pomaka’i, 13.5 miles east of Kaunakakai
Sunday 5:30-6:30 pm

What type of health services are there on the island? For instance, hospitals, clinics, doctors, dentists, etc. If there are none on the island where do locals go to get their health needs?

Molokai General is a small but well equipped hospital which has been recently remodeled and upgraded. It can handle most emergent care needs. At the same location is a small clinic with 2-3 resident physicians that is also used by visiting doctors who come to Molokai on a scheduled basis.

Patients requiring specialized care or hospitalization are flown to Honolulu for treatment.

Molokai Drugs is the one pharmacy on the island and they can fill most prescriptions. Check with John or David in advance to be sure. 808.553.5790.

Do most of the grocery stores accept debit cards and/or credit cards?

The grocery stores and most merchants accept either debit or credit cards. However, a few of the dining places do not, The Pizza Cafe and Kualapuu Cook House for example.

It’s a good idea, when visiting Hawaii, to bring travelers checks and a little cash. As a caveat, most merchants on Molokai do not change currencies, so be sure to have US denominations with you.

How available are ATMs?

There are ATMs at both Bank of Hawaii and American Savings Bank, which are 1/2 a block apart on Ala Malama Street in Kaunakakai.

Hotel Molokai, Paddlers Inn and Pizza Cafe have private ATMs

Is there a beach or area on Molokai that is particularly good for seeing and collecting seashells?

The west-end beaches offer chances to find the rare Kahelelani shells, which are very small and used for making highly prized leis. After a big north west swell, some other shells will also wash onto west-end beaches.

South shore beaches offer interesting shelling after a big swell occurs because the shells are stripped from the barrier reef by the big waves and washed ashore
.
The answer really is, luck will play a big part in your shell gathering success. However, on Molokai it’s not the number of shells you find, but the amount of joy acquired while searching.

Hope this helps.

How far in advance is required to charter the dive boat? What documents are need to obtain scuba gear?

The only dive boats on Molokai are operated by Molokai Fish and Dive. Usually a couple days notice will be sufficient lead time for SCUBA charters. Scuba gear is furnished for all of their dives and you will need to present a PADI (or similar) Diver’s certification card. You can find more details here – http://scubadivemolokai.com

If you want to bicycle while here, see Phillip at Molokai Bike shop, at 80 Mohala st Kaunakakai.

808.553.3931 http://www.bikehawaii.com/molokaibicycle

Is there anywhere on the island to rent a kayak? I really don’t want to pay for an excursion.

The only folks I know who are renting kayaks for unaccompanied trips is http://molokai-outdoors.com

Sorry. No one is currently offering sailing charters on Molokai.

Would you suggest places for leisure walking or hiking?

Most of the leisure walking areas are at or close to the beach. Papohaku Beach Park on the west end offers a small park and Hawaii’s longest white sand beach. Many people walk or jog the road in that area because there is very little traffic and there are several accesses to other beaches. Also on the west end are a couple old dirt roads the have no traffic and lead to secluded beaches.

One Ali’i Beach Park on the south shore is a large, open, grassy park with a beach that offers nice strolling.

Near the Kalaupapa Lookout you’ll find a short trail through the forest to the phallic stone. A few hundred feet from the lookout parking area, you’ll find Pala’au State park.

The trail down to the Kalaupapa Peninsula is a spectacular walk, but you must take the tour when you reach the bottom. If you’re on Molokai, a visit to Kalaupapa and the tour should not be missed. The tour costs about $50. Visitors must be at least 16 years old.

Once a month the Nature Conservancy 808.553.5236, offers guided walks through the rain forest and also guided hikes of the dunes area of Mo’omomi.

At about 14 miles east of Kaunakakai is a dirt road that leads to Ilili’opae Heiau, an ancient hawaiin platform temple used for human sacrfices. About a 1/2 mile walk. Look for the hawaiian warrior sign on the highway.

There are also guided hikes available to Moa Ula Falls in the Halawa Valley on the east end. About $75 for a five hour cultural hike.

Yes you can. There are 2 excellent choices for deep sea or near shore fishing.

Captain Mike Holmes – http://molokaifishing.com has a gazillion years of fishing and ocean experience. His boat is a Force 27 called Ahi.

Captain Joe Reich – http://www.alycecfishing.com specializes in deep sea charters on his boat the Alyce C.

Both boats are moored at the Kaunakakai harbor.

When planning a visit to Kalaupapa, an important consideration is that children under 16 years old are not allowed in the colony by Health Department regulations.

This regulation was enacted in the “old” days, before the advent of the treatment drugs in the 1940s. The very young are more susceptible to the disease and were therefore excluded from visiting.

Yes. Every Saturday from about 7:00am – noon there is a farmers and crafters market in front of the two banks on Ala Malama Street in Kaunakakai. That’s just off the highway near the Chevron station (mile marker 0).

You can usually find a wide selection of island grown fruits, vegetables and flowers, plus a plethora of locally made arts and crafts. If you’re on-island on a Saturday, this is a great place to spend part of your morning.

Unlike the other islands that have a large visitor base to support commercial luaus, Molokai doesn’t have enough visitors to support that kind of offering.

From time to time the local hula halaus (schools) will put on a luau and show as a fund-raiser to allow them to travel off island. Moana’s Halau usually has their big show in mid February.

Sorry to disappoint.

However, if you’ll be on Oahu during your Hawaii visit, I suggest Germaine’s Luau http://www.germainesluau.com. If you’ll be on Maui I suggest Old Lahaina Luau http://www.oldlahainaluau.com

Hope this helps.

Can I go horseback riding?

Not anymore. Pu’u O Hoku Ranch has discontinued the last horseback rides on Molokai. Sorry.

I’m a scuba diver, what’s available on Molokai?

There are several spectacular dive sites on the island’s barrier reef, which stretches for about 26 miles along the south shore. The folks at Molokai Fish and Dive http://scubadivemolokai.com are the only ones on Molokai that are PADI approved to take divers out. You can call them at 808.553.5926.

Almost all diving is from boats as there are very few beach launching places on the island.

Where can I snorkel?

We normally suggest Murphy’s Beach to folks who wish to snorkel on Molokai. It’s located at mile marker 20 on the east end. The beach is nice, the water is shallow and clear and almost always safe for swimming/snorkeling.

Another good choice is Dixi Maru Beach on the west end. It is a protected cove that offers safe swimming/snorkeling except when the winter surf is very high.

For all ocean activities on Molokai, EXERCISE CAUTION. A good basic rule is “If you don’t see local folks in the water, you probably don’t want to go in.” Be especially careful on the long Papohaku Beach. Winter surf there is EXTREMELY dangerous, don’t even go wading there.
You can rent snorkel gear at http://molokaifishanddive.com if you don’t bring your own.

If you’d like a real adventure, go on a snorkel tour of our spectacular reef with http://snorkelmolokai.com or http://molokaioceantours.com/

They will take you to the reef’s edge in their dive boat so you can swim and visit with colorful tropical fish, turtles, and other reef critters.

I am a runner and I plan to visit Molokai in July. Can you give me information on locations where I could run? I enjoy trails the most but the beaches would be nice as well.

You can usually run safely on any of the roads, especially in the west end Kaluakoi resort area. If you want a beach to run, there is 3-mile long Papohaku beach on the west end.

There aren’t any designated running trails, but there are lots of dirt roads going to beaches or up the mountain that should work nicely.

There is the delightful, municipal Ironwood Hills course. Great fun anytime with beautiful views and inexpensive greens fees.

Ironwood Hill greens fees:
$25.00 (9 holes) carts available
Phone – 808.567.6000

Where to Eat on Molokai – Reviews

See detailed restaurant location info and photos here – http://visitmolokai.net/?page_id=291

The visitmolokai.com editors help you decide where to eat on the island.

Restaurants that would be categorized as “fine dining” elsewhere in Hawaii or the rest of the world do not exist on Molokai. However, one can eat well here just don’t set your expectations too high.

Because dining is such a subjective experience, we scored the island’s eating choices compared to other places on Molokai rather than compared to dining options elsewhere in the world.

We live here and eat at the places often, so these are our scores based on many experiences. Your mileage may vary.

Only Paddler’s Inn and Hula Shores at Hotel Molokai accept credit cards. ALL others require cash or travelers checks.

$ – $$$$ – Indicates price level compared to other places on Molokai.
Q – QQQQ – Indicates quality level compared to other places on Molokai.
A – AAAA – Indicates ambiance and atmosphere compared to other Molokai eateries.

Molokai Pizza Cafe
$$$, QQQ, AAA
Excellent pizza, great sub or pocket sandwiches, tasty plated dishes, daily specials. Air-conditioned.

Molokai Burger
$$$, QQ, AAA
Average burgers, fries and milk shakes. Nice white-tiled decor, air-conditioned.

Paddlers Inn
$$$, QQQ, AAA
Nice plated dishes, burgers, sandwiches, full meals. Comfortable bar.

Molokai Dive in
$$, QQ, AA
Very local drive in. Burgers, fries, etc. Big, inexpensive breakfasts, Oriental and Hawaiian choices. A/C dining inside, climatically cooled dining outside.

Outpost Natural Foods
$$, QQ, A
Health food store serving some interesting vegetarian choices. Take-out only.

Kanemitsu’s Bakery
$$, QQ, AA
Breakfast only, usually pretty good. Pastries & Molokai French Bread. Atmosphere is very Molokai local.

Mrs K’s
$$, QQQ, AA
Burgers, sandwiches, plate lunches. Basically take-out, but there are a few tables outside.

Big Daddy’s
$$, QQQ, A
Filipino & Local plate lunches. Take-out, but there are a few tables inside.

Maka’s Korner
$$$, QQQ, AA
Burgers, plate lunches, local favorites. Umbrella tables outside.

Sundown Deli
$$, QQQ, A
Nice selection of sandwiches and soup. Pretty much take-out only.

Kamoi Snacks
$$$, QQQ, A
Umpteen selections of Dave’s Hawaiian Ice Cream. Take out only.

Hula Shores
$$$$, QQQ, AAAA
Hotel Molokai Restaurant. Good food, cocktails. Right on the beach.

Manae Goodz n Grindz
$$, QQQ, AA
Good plate lunches, sandwiches and burgers. Take-out with some outside tables. Only eats on the east end.

Kualapu’u Cookhouse
$$$, QQQ, AAA
Tasty local choices for breakfast & lunch. Excellent dinner specials.

Coffee of Hawaii
$$$, QQQ, AAA
Sandwiches, pastries, desert drinks, comfortable lanai dining area.

Beer, wine and bottled spirits can be purchased in the grocery stores(friendly Market
has largest selection) or in the Wine & Spirits store.

Cocktails can be obtained at Paddlers Inn & Hotel Molokai.

Are bottles of liquor expensive? Is there a good selection of brands?

While your exact favorite brand may not be available on Molokai, you’ll be able to find a good selection of alcoholic beverages between the three stores listed above. Prices will be somewhat higher than on the mainland.

We are going to be on Molokai for a 50th wedding anniversary family celebration. Who can we contact to order a cake?

Kanemitsu’s Bakery should be able to handle your needs. 808.553.8058

Grocery stores on Molokai

You’ll be able to shop the two grocery stores in Kaunakakai, Friendly Market and Misaki’s, any day except Sunday. Friendly Market is open 8:30am – 8:30pm M-F and 8:30am – 6:30pm on Saturday. Miskai’s has the same hours except they stay open until 8:30pm Saturdays. While the prices are higher than the mainland, you won’t gasp too much at the expense.

On Sunday, Misaki’s is open 9:30am – 11:30am, the health food store is open all day with fresh fruit and veggies and Wine and Spirits is open all day for emergency supplies.

Also in Kaunakakai – Molokai Minimart – Quick stop groceries, sundries and beverages
7:00am-11:00pm, Mon-Sat – 8:00am-11:00pm, Sunday.

In Maunaloa, on the West end, you’ll find the General Store – Open 8:00am – 6:00pm M-S and 8:00am – Noon Sunday.

In the village of Kualapu’u you’ll find the Kualapu’u Market. Open 8:30am – 6:00pm M-S, Closed on Sunday.

Here’s the full info page for Molokai grocery stores – Grocery Stores

There is one hotel on the island. Hotel Molokai looks like an old Polynesian escape that is right at the water’s edge about 2 miles east of Kaunakakai. Has a restaurant and bar and entertainment most evenings.
Moderately priced http://hotelmolokai.com

Condominium choices are available at Wavecrest on the East end, Molokai Shores near Kaunakakai and in the Kaluakoi Resort area on the West end. You can find an abundance of west end choices listed on these condo pages –

Paniolo Hale

Kepuhi Beach Resort

Ke Nani Kai Resort

Central and east end choices here –

Molokai Shores

Wavecrest Resort

An excellent place to start your accommodations search is the feature comparisons page for all the condos and the hotel here – Condo Comparison

Beach houses and bungalows are mostly available on the tropical East end with a few large rental homes on the west end. Look for some great places at – Beach Houses

You’ll also find a few other lodging choices here, including bed & breakfast, apartments and ohana houses – Bed and Breakfast – etc

Is there a chart that compares features of all the vacation rental choices?

You can find a comparison chart and local insights for the condos and the hotel here – Vacation Rental Comparisons

That covers about 90% of the choices.

Aloha!
My husband is considering accepting a job offer on Molokai and we’re curious as to the best way to find a long term rental.
Any suggestions?
Thank you!

A good way to begin your search is to check with Dayna and her crew at – http://realestateonmolokai.com

What’s the name of the grouping of 10 or so 1-2 bedroom condos right next to Hotel Molokai?

Do you have their contact information?

The only condos near the hotel are at Molokai Shores which is at mile marker 1. You’re probably referring to a group of single family homes located between the two. They are not vacation rentals.

Sorry.

Sorry to say the Sheraton Lodge at Molokai Ranch closed a few years ago when Molokai Ranch ceased operations on the island.

We are looking for wheelchair accessible vacation rental. Are there any on the Island?

Most of the ground floor units in the Kepuhi Beach Resort (Kaluakoi Villas) condominiums will be accessible. The cottages and unit numbers that begin with a 1 (one) are ground floor units.

Some of the units at Paniolo Hale will be accessible. Check with the owners or rental agent.

Ground floor units at Molokai Shores and those at Wavecrest will be accessible. Select a unit number beginning with a 1.

While Molokai has a plethora of condominium and beach house accommodations available, the rental rates are $100/night and up. There aren’t many lodging choices in the “budget” category.

One good choice is Hale Malu guesthouse http://halemalu-molokai.com in the uplands near the Kalaupapa lookout and the mule ride. It has 2 bedrooms in the main house available at about $50/night and a 2 room cottage which is accessible through the main house at about $80.

Are there campsites available?

There are two county parks on Molokai that allow camping, One Alii (Royal Sands) on the south-center part of the island, and Papohaku Beach Park on the West end.

Both parks have luas (bathrooms) and showers. $3 per night permits can be acquired from the Maui County Parks & Recreation department in Kaunakakai. 808.553.3204 It’s a good idea to call in advance to secure permits.

Palaau State Park is at the end of the Kalae Highway overlooking the Kalaupapa peninsula. Camping is free, but get a permit from the State Division of Parks 808.567.6618.

Are there pay phones or internet cafes on Molokai? What is the best way to
stay in touch with the mainland?

There several pay phones in or near Kaunakakai.
In front of the post office,
In front of the American Savings Bank,
In front of Misaki’s Grocery,
In front Hawaiian Telcom office,
At One Ali’i Park

Cell phone service is somewhat spotty on the island, with best signal strength available from Verizon or At&t. Pretty good signal available from one mile east of Kaunakakai and continuing past the airport to the Kauluakoi turnoff at mile 15 west. Some locations on the east end after mile 13, pickup signals from Maui.

The closest thing to an internet cafe on Molokai is the lanai at Coffees of Hawaii in Kaulapu’u. Bring your own laptop computer, they provide free, high-speed, wireless access. There is also WiFi available at Molokai Burgers and Molokai Pharmacy. In addition, the library in Kaunakakai has a few computers that are available for patrons.

Is high speed internet available to purchase if you rent a property on Molokai?
Do you know if it’s DSL or cable?

If my husband accepts the job I’ll be running an internet business and will need reliable, fast service. Any help you can give on this subject would be much appreciated!

DSL is available in and around Kaunakakai. High speed cable access is available most everywhere on the island. While the cable offers somewhat higher speeds, it is susceptible to downtime, especially during inclement weather. On the other hand, my DSL connection has never been down even when my land line voice connection failed during a huge rain storm.

You can. The 100 foot yacht Molokai Princess provides daily round trip service between Lahaina, Maui and Kaunakakai, Molokai. The trip between ports takes about 90 minutes through the Kalohi Channel and tickets run about $130.00 round trip. Children’s prices are about half that.

A previous visitor said “The Molokai Princess is open air atop, a middle somewhat enclosed section and a bottom totally enclosed area near the engine room. The ride to Molokai is always a joy under average weather conditions…But the ride back to Maui in the PM can be a wet and wild ride. If your prone to sea-sickness take adequate precautions, Dramamine etc, and try if possible to ride center on the boat. Overall it’s an awesome ride with friendly crew.”

Molokai is safer than almost anywhere else in the US.

Single women from all over the world have visited and I’ve never heard of any disasters befalling them. The only caveat would be to employ the same safety measures you would at other visitor destinations.

Mosquitos? Ticks? Just wondering if I should pack bug spray.

In some of the very tropical areas, like Halawa Valley or in the rain forest, you will encounter mosquitoes, so insect repellent is strongly suggested. There are ticks, but they don’t seem to attack humans as much as they do the other mammals on the island. Our dog seems to attract ticks, but his monthly dose of Frontline keeps them to a minimum.

A little note for those who don’t yet know about Maui County’s plastic bag ban. As of 01/11/11 merchants are not allowed to use plastic bags to package your purchases.

So if you’ll be shopping while you’re here, have bags with you. Of course most merchants have cloth shopping bags available for sale at the checkout area.

Some of the condo owners may provide shopping bags, but I suggest you bring some from home. Even plastic bags are acceptable, they make excellent containers in your suitcase for damp or sandy clothing.

If your objective is to “DO” as many islands as possible in a short period of time, Molokai is probably not for you. Life’s pace is slow here. We like it that way. Plan to spend 3 days to a month so you can truly unwind and enjoy your visit.

A previous visitor writes “It is truly hard to enjoy Molokai in a day. But if your staying on Maui and would like to take a short visit, The Molokai Princess has day packages, Car and cruise or small guided bus excursions. We’ve taken the Alii bus tour, which is quite nice.
We’ve also hopped the early morning ferry and spent the day in Kaunakakai town. It’s a little over a mile from the harbor to town, and an easy walk, have some lunch and meander around the shops and enjoy the people.”

“On one trip my wife and I walked to Hotel Molokai for lunch, it’s has a beautiful little restaurant, “Hula Shores” right on the waters edge at Kamiloloa Beach. Although I wouldn’t recommend this walk to just anybody, it’s about 2 1/2 miles from town and walking the Kamehameha V highway can become very hot and seem endless when on foot. It was a great adventure for us tho. :)

Yes. Unless you plan to employee one of the few tour services, we recommend a rental car so you can visit as much of the island as possible.

There are 2 choices – http://alamo.com at the airport and http://molokai-car-rental.com the local guys in Kaunakakai.

I have heard recently from some of my friends on Oahu that the mood on Molokai is depressed due to the recent closing of the Molokai ranch. That is totally understandable, but I was told that the mood has affected vacationers/tourists and that it is not a good place to vacation. For example, I have heard that the restaurants are prejudiced against tourists and that tourists do not get waited on readily. Do you think it is a good idea to come to Molokai or wait for a better time?

The mood on Molokai is not at all depressed and the aloha spirit is as bright as ever.

Our beautiful island is a wonderful place to vacation unless you need glitz and glamor. If you do, I suggest you visit Maui or Waikiki on Oahu.

If you’re wanting Old Hawaii, peace and quiet, beautiful people and rural atmosphere, Molokai should be perfect for you. Most visitors are amazed at the aloha displayed by local folks. They don’t call it the friendly island for nothing.

When we travel we usually pay for purchases with a credit card. Is that hard to do on Molokai? We don’t usually like to carry a lot of cash with us for safety reasons.

Many places accept credit cards; the grocery stores, retail shops, the lodging facilities, activity providers, etc. However other places do not – many eating establishments (Hotel Molokai & Paddlers excepted), street vendors and so forth. It is wise to have some cash with you on Molokai. Traveler’s checks are treated as cash.

Hope this helps.

I have two boys, ages 6 and 8 and want to plan a trip to Molokai because I hear everything is slower paced! Can you mail some info?

It’s possible the Molokai Visitors Association may still be sending out paper info.
Check http://molokai-hawaii.com

However, your best information source is The Visitor Center
You’ll find everything you need to know about Molokai there.

Hope this helps.

Over the past few years we seem to get that question more and more. The best source for information about former patients at the settlement is http://kalaupapaohana.org

They are a nonprofit organization formed in 2003 that is dedicated to promoting the value and dignity of every individual who was ever exiled to Kalaupapa beginning in 1866.

Use the the contact page – kalaupapaohana.org/contact-us.html to email them your ancestor information request. They can provide information that should get you on the path to finding any ancestors you might have had at Kalaupapa.

I would like to know what the people who live on Molokai do for a living.
What opportunities are there for jobs?

Unlike the other islands in Hawaii, job opportunities on Molokai are scarce.
One of the island’s largest employers, Molokai Ranch, recently ceased operations and laid off 120 employees. That’s about 15% of the island work force.

In addition to the state and Maui County government offices and schools, other “large” employers include Coffees of Hawaii and the Monsanto corn seed company. additional employed folks work for the local small businesses like the two grocery stores, restaurants or retail stores. The remainder of the work force consists of people who are able to earn a living on small farms or working from home as artists, photographers, etc. Many supplement their income through sales of art, crafts or produce at the Saturday market.

In short, anyone who is thinking of moving to Molokai should bring their employment or lots of money with them or plan on working at two or more jobs, like many here do, to make ends meet.

The ocean temperature in Hawaii only varies 10 degrees throughout the year. At 80 degrees, the water is warmest in September and the ocean is coldest in March at 70 degrees.

Regarding the phallic stone of Molokai, the Molokai Site Survey by Catherine C. Summers states;

KAULEONANAHOA, PALA’AU

Kauleonanahoa, “The penis of Nanahoa,” is a phallic stone which is situated slightly to the E of the southern brow of Nanahoa hill. Before the reforestation program was begun in this area in the 1930’s, it could be seen standing prominently on the skyline for several miles from the S.

Phallic stones are found on all the Hawaiian Islands, but this one is the finest example of such a stone. It has been carved to some extent, but how much the natural conformation of the rock contributed to tis present form cannot be determined. Stokes provided the following description of this stone:

Except in its southern aspect, the stone has much the appearance of the head and anterior portion of a turtle. The head, inclined upward at an angle of 45o , is set on a short, nearly horizontal neck springing from a larger, semiglobular block partly in the ground. The tip is about 5 feet higher than the ground at the base, but as the ground drops away on the south, a view from this direction makes the stone appear much higher. In general appearance the head is sub-cylindrical, but on the northern side there is a weathered groove beginning near the tip and widening rapidly as it approaches the neck . . .

The stone appeared to me to be a natural formation . . . There was, however, some artificial work on the stone, i.e. a slight hammering on a blunt ridge underneath the head, where the latter joined the neck; although the surface thus formed did not seem as ancient as the rest of the stone.

Beyond the name, and their recognition of the form, and the opinion that Nanahoa was probably a chief, I could get no history of the place from the few local natives remaining (Stokes, n.d.c.)

Coelho also wrote an account of Nanahoa, in the Hawaiian newspaper Ka Nupepa Ku’oka’a; following is a translated excerpt.

In the beginning Kaunanahoa and his wife [Kawahuna] lived where the Nanahoa (stone) stands. One day, a peculiar but beautiful woman appeared and went up there. As she prayed and offered her gifts, she glanced up-ward and saw Nanahoa blinking his eyes at her. She climbed up to the top where the plain of Kaiolohia could be easily seen and there she peered into a small pool*. [*When there has been a heavy rain, a small pool is formed on the stone of Nanahoa at the base of the “neck.”]

As she sat admiring the incomparable beauty of the small pool, Kawahuna’s hands reached out and grabbed her by the hair. As they struggled, Nanahoa lost his temper and gave the woman whose right (husband) he was [Kawahuna] a hard slap. She staggered back and rolled down the cliff side into a depression at the foot . . .

That was how they became separated to his day. Nanahoa stands alone on the hill and Kawahuna lies alone on the plain. What a pity. The husband was at fault and the wife suffered for it and both became stones to this day (1924b).

It is said that if a woman goes to Kauleonanahoa with offerings and spends the night there, she will return home pregnant. According to Coelho’s account, after the land had become barren due to the fighting of husbands and wives,

. . . the few chiefs who remained saw that there was no people to gather to their presence and that the women did not give birth, the kahunas were asked to appeal to the gods for the race to revive. Through a revelation received, all the women who were not pregnant were commanded to go to Pu’u Lua with their offerings to give to Kaunanahoa and his companion. They spent the night at the base of the wonderful (stone) and when they went home each was pregnant. Each had a bundle to cary home (Coelho, 1924b).

Deserted, pristine, long, short, wide, narrow, white, tan, gray, black. Take your pick. Papohaku on the west end is the longest white sand beach in the Hawaiian Islands. Stretching nearly three miles, it is the perfect place for beach combing, jogging or just catching a few rays. If you’re looking for solitude by the ocean, this could be your answer. It is never crowded and many times you’ll find you have the entire beach to yourself. Also on the west end, fronting Kaluakoi Resort, is Kepuhi beach. A favorite of visitors and locals alike for surfing, sunning, fishing and when the ocean is calm, swimming.

Molokai doesn’t have the abundance of great swimming beaches that some of the other islands boast, but there are many beaches that offer safe, uncrowded swimming and snorkeling. Season and ocean conditions dictate which beaches will best suit your personal wishes. During the summer and fall the west end beaches, Kepuhi, Papohaku, Make Horse and Dixie Maru, are good choices. However, the winter ocean swells create monster waves that make dangerous albeit beautiful surf conditions.

The great thing about our beaches – there’s always another choice.

If the surf is pounding on the west end, the southeast beaches are normally perfect for that refreshing dip or tropical fish viewing excursion. Try Murphy’s Beach at mile marker 20 or Sandy Beach just beyond. Both are protected by Hawaii’s only barrier reef and offer safe swimming most of the year.

If you’re troubled because there is someone else on Your beach, just drive down the road and pick another. Perhaps Kawili beach in the beautiful Halawa Valley. It is safe for swimming when the ocean is calm, but has strong rip currents when the surf is up. Either way it’s always a quiet spot to relax and take in the beauty of Halawa.

For great Molokai beach photo guides with maps visit – Try The Beaches Page

It’s been called that. Here’s Why.

In the mid 1800s leprosy (today called Hansen’s Disease) was brought to Hawaii by Chinese who came to labor in the sugar cane fields. Many Hawaiians were stricken with Ma’i Pake (the Chinese sickness). Since there was then no cure for the disease, strict isolation was the only means available to keep the disease from spreading.

In 1866 the first sufferers were abandoned on Kalaupapa, a small peninsula on the north side of Molokai. Surrounded on three sides by the Pacific Ocean and with sea cliffs 2000 feet high on the fourth, Kalaupapa was a prison from which escape was impossible.

Father Damien, a Belgian priest, came to Molokai in 1873 to minister to the needs of the dying. Through his ministry and labors, order was created where there had been only suffering and chaos. He succumbed to the disease in 1889.

Sulfone drugs developed in the early 1940s, put the disease in remission and the carriers were no longer contagious. Today less than 20 residents call Kalaupapa home. The peninsula is now a National Historic Site administered by the US Park Service.

While Kalaupapa is a National Historic Site, it is also the home of the few former patients who have chosen to remain there. So access, is by law, strictly regulated. Unless you are invited by one of the residents, you must take the tour offered by Damien Tours of Kalaupapa (about $60.00). The peninsula can be reached by air or by way of the trail that snakes down the sheer cliffs 1600 feet from upper Molokai. Visitors can hike in and out or ride one of the famous Molokai mules. Either way, Molokai Mule Ride can make the necessary arrangements. Visitors must be at least 16 years old.

Deserted, pristine, long, short, wide, narrow, white, tan, gray, black. Take your pick. Papohaku on the west end is the longest white sand beach in the Hawaiian Islands. Stretching nearly three miles, it is the perfect place for beach combing, jogging or just catching a few rays. If you’re looking for solitude by the ocean, this could be your answer. It is never crowded and many times you’ll find you have the entire beach to yourself. Also on the west end, fronting Kaluakoi Resort, is Kepuhi beach. A favorite of visitors and locals alike for surfing, sunning, fishing and when the ocean is calm, swimming.

Molokai doesn’t have the abundance of great swimming beaches that some of the other islands boast, but there are many beaches that offer safe, uncrowded swimming and snorkeling. Season and ocean conditions dictate which beaches will best suit your personal wishes. During the summer and fall the west end beaches, Kepuhi, Papohaku, Make Horse and Dixie Maru, are good choices. However, the winter ocean swells create monster waves that make dangerous albeit beautiful surf conditions.

The great thing about our beaches – there’s always another choice.

If the surf is pounding on the west end, the southeast beaches are normally perfect for that refreshing dip or tropical fish viewing excursion. Try Murphy’s Beach at mile marker 20 or Sandy Beach just beyond. Both are protected by Hawai’i’s only barrier reef and offer safe swimming most of the year.

If you’re troubled because there is someone else on Your beach, just drive down the road and pick another. Perhaps Kawili beach in the beautiful Halawa Valley. It is safe for swimming when the ocean is calm, but has strong rip currents when the surf is up. Either way it’s always a quiet spot to relax and take in the beauty of Halawa.

Consult the Molokai Beaches page for more information.

Yes. Unless you plan to employee one of the few tour services or hire a taxi, we recommend a rental car so you can visit as much of the island as possible.

If your objective is to Do as many islands as possible in a short period of time, Molokai is probably not for you. Life’s pace is slow here. We like it that way. Plan to spend 3 days to a month so you can truly unwind and enjoy your visit.

When can you get away? Actually, anytime is a great time to visit. The weather is usually good year round with temperatures averaging about 75°F and rarely going 6 or 7 degrees above or below.

In winter (Dec. thru Mar.), the nights may drop to the lower 60s and you’re more likely to experience a rainy day. No Rain – No Rainbows! Spring, summer and fall are all very similar with warm days (up to 85°F) cooled by the trade winds and pleasant evenings in the mid to lower 70s. You can find more details on the climate page.

Molokai isn’t called “The Friendly Island” for nothing. The aloha spirit is alive and well here. It’s a way of life. Many visitors are overwhelmed by this open, friendly, caring attitude. It’s something you have to experience to believe or understand.

By the way, “Native” is a term looked upon with great disfavor by the residents of Hawaii. Say “Local” or “Kama’aina”. You wouldn’t want to offend would you?

About 8,000 residents on Molokai. We are part of Maui county, which consists of Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Kahoolawe. Total county population is about 128,000. Kalaupapa is in a separate county, Kalawao County, population about 150.

Other population counts include
Hawaii County (The Big Island) – 149,000
Honolulu County (Oahu) – 876,000
Kauai County – 59,000

That’s a short question. Too bad there isn’t a short answer.

Anything not produced on Molokai (that means almost everything) is expensive by mainland U.S. standards. Most of the items in the stores have to be shipped from their point of manufacture to Honolulu, unloaded, reloaded on a barge and shipped to Molokai. This ups the retail price by 20 to 100%.

On the other hand, room rates are, in most cases, lower than like accommodations on the other islands. You can have a nice condo that sleeps 4 comfortably for around $125 a night. Less per night for stays of a week or more. Likewise, dining out is no more expensive than at other Hawai’i visitor destinations.

Yes you can. After being closed to the public for quite a while, the trails to Moa’ula Falls at the head of Halawa Valley are again being used. Guided hiking tours are now available with resident guides who offer real historical and cultural insight. Contact Molokai Fish & Dive to book your trip.

According to the Hawaiian Gazette, Dec. 17, 1867 – “Deer. – Some fine, healthy deer arrived in good order last week per Loch-Na-Garr, consigneed to Dr. Hillebrand by Mr. Magniac, a member of the well-known house of Jardine, Mathison & Co., of Hong Kong. They are Speckled Indian deer, a variety well adapted to domestication on our islands. A gentleman residing on the upper Ganges, where these deer abound, offered to supply them for transportation here, when Dr. Hillebrand was in Calcutta, and at his suggestion that His Majesty was desirous to obtain them, this consignment was made to Hong Kong.” “Three bucks and four hinds have arrived safely.” “They have been delivered to the king and will be sent to Molokai.”

They were and they flourished. Today there are deer on all parts of the island and it is not unusual to see them, especially in the early mornings or evenings.

You can. The 100 foot yacht Molokai Princess provides daily round-trip service between Lahaina, Maui and Kaunakakai, Molokai. The trip between ports takes about 90 minutes through the Kalohi Channel and tickets run about $100.00 round trip. Children’s prices are about half that.

Yes. There are 2 county beach parks which offer overnight tent camping. Papohaku Beach Park on the west end and One Ali’i Beach Park on the south side both have rest rooms and shower facilities. You’ll need to acquire camping permits from the parks and recreation department which run $3.00 per night. It’s a good idea to call in advance. 808.553.3204

There is also Pala’au State Park in Kalae for tent camping. It has restrooms, but no showers. Check the camping page for all the Molokai camping details.

Yes! Ironwood Hills is a nine hole municipal course located in beautiful, cool Kalae. It’s a fun course and the rates are dirt cheap.

While it can sometimes be a challenge to get here, it’s worth it. You’ll need to book a flight to Maui or Honolulu, where you’ll catch your inter-island connecting flight into Molokai or catch the Maui-Molokai ferry from Lahaina.

Consult the transportation page for information on getting here and getting around our island.

You’ll probably find the answers by using the Search Box. If the answer is not there, use the form on the Contact Us page to send us your questions. We will do our best to email an accurate response.

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